Pwy Ydym Ni

Mae cyfoeth o wybodaeth ar gael ar sut i gefnogi bywyd gwyllt ar dir fferm. Dyma rai o’r adnoddau ar-lein sy’n cynnig cymorth ac arweiniad ymarferol os oes gennych ddiddordeb mewn darganfod mwy

Beth yw'r Rhwydwaith Ffermio sy'n Gyfeillgar i Natur?

  • Mae’r Rhwydwaith Ffermio sy’n Gyfeillgar i Natur yn cael ei arwain gan ffermwyr ledled y DU sy’n frwd dros ffermio cynaliadwy a byd natur

  • Rydym yn ceisio uno ffermwyr ledled y DU sydd â rhagolygon cynaliadwy

  • Rydym yn ceisio sicrhau newidiadau cadarnhaol mewn polisi, gan gynnwys sut y caiff ffermio ei gefnogi gan y cyhoedd

  • Gyda'n gilydd gallwn gyflawni mwy a dysgu oddi wrth ein gilydd

  • I weld ein safbwynt polisi cliciwch yma

Cwrdd â'r tîm

Martin Lines

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Martin Lines

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Martin is a farmer and contractor in South Cambridgeshire, growing mainly arable crops on his family farm and rented land. He has a special interest in farm conservation management, currently running an ELS and HLS agreement and has Countryside Stewardship schemes on land he rents and manages. He also supports the delivery of Stewardship schemes for a number of other farmers. Martin is the NFFN Chief Executive Officer and hopes to see the network grow with like-minded farmers and land managers who will work together, sharing best practices and demonstrating what can be accomplished for nature and the environment while producing great produce.

Phil Carson

Arweinydd Cynaliadwy ar gyfer Gogledd Iwerddon ac Arweinydd Polisi ar gyfer y DU

Phil Carson

Arweinydd Cynaliadwy ar gyfer Gogledd Iwerddon ac Arweinydd Polisi ar gyfer y DU

Phil is an experienced land use policy professional, with nearly a decade's experience in a range of areas including agricultural advice, conservation land management and sustainable land use policy. He is passionate about finding solutions to complex land use problems from policy development through to practical delivery. Phil hopes to increase the Network’s influence on land use policy decisions across the UK, to ensure they work for both farmers and the environment.

Alena Walker

Rheolwr Cyfathrebu y DU

Alena Walker

Rheolwr Cyfathrebu y DU

Alena is a communications and media specialist, having worked in PR and as a writer for independent magazines internationally. Her eclectic editorial and multimedia experience includes projects focused on food system change, cultural identity, sustainability and environmental advocacy. She was a finalist in the Mogford Short Story Prize in food writing and a Young Writer Delegate for the Irish Writers Centre and Irish Literature Festival Dublin. Alena works to amplify the NFFN’s voice in press and media, expand knowledge sharing between NFFN members and raise awareness of the ever-growing benefits that nature-friendly farming can bring to people, food and our environment. Alena is passionate about creating sustainable social and environmental change and she’s involved in local food growing projects in Northern Ireland.

Grwpiau Llywio

Anthony Curwen

England Steering Group

Anthony Curwen

England Steering Group

Anthony runs Quex Park which is a country estate in Kent. The estate grows wheat, oilseed rape, oats, beans, potatoes and maize silage, contract farms and has 60 hectares under environmental schemes. A programme of diversification was also implemented which includes children’s soft play centre, craft village, adventure golf, maize maze, farmshop, restaurant, garden nursery, forest school and paintball as well as events ranging from classic car days to music festivals. He believes passionately that farming and conservation must have a joint approach and it is essential for the future that the public of all ages need to be informed and enthused about the countryside and its importance for food production and wildlife. He has previously been the Kent NFU chairman and been Trustee Board member of the Kent County Agricultural Society.


James Robinson

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

James Robinson

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

James is the fifth generation of his family to farm at Strickley, a 300 acre all grassland organic dairy farm near Kendal, south Cumbria. The farm carries 130 Dairy Shorthorn cows plus 120 youngstock, all cattle are homebred and are also a closed high health herd. Strickley has been part of an environmental stewardship scheme since 1991, when a Hedgerow Incentive Scheme was started to improve and protect the farm’s seven miles of ancient hedgerow. Those hedgerows now make fantastic corridors of life, surrounding the 60 small fields which make up the farm and connect ancient woodland with habitat rich becks, a two-acre pond and newly created wetland areas.

Nature plays a big part in the farm’s decisions and everything possible is done to enhance the biodiversity of all the habitats. In 2022 James and his family were presented with the highly coveted ‘Silver Lapwing’ award, something the whole family is incredibly proud of. The farm is currently in higher-tier and also a mid-tier scheme. Local schools benefit from free visits to Strickley and enjoy pond dipping, hedgerow safaris and learning about dairy production, among other things. James is also keen to learn from outside organisations and works closely with The Cumbria Wildlife Trust and South Cumbria Rivers Trust. He hopes to build on these relationships for the benefit of everyone.


Martin Lines

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Martin Lines

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Martin is a farmer and contractor in South Cambridgeshire, growing mainly arable crops on his family farm and rented land. He has a special interest in farm conservation management, currently running an ELS and HLS agreement and has Countryside Stewardship schemes on land he rents and manages. He also supports the delivery of Stewardship schemes for a number of other farmers. Martin is the NFFN Chief Executive Officer and hopes to see the network grow with like-minded farmers and land managers who will work together, sharing best practices and demonstrating what can be accomplished for nature and the environment while producing great produce.

Chris Clark

Cadeirydd NFFN Lloegr

Chris Clark

Cadeirydd NFFN Lloegr

Chris and his wife Fiona have recently moved to Exeridge Farm, Oakfordbridge, Devon, a new and exciting challenge involving ancient woodland and hay meadow restoration and creation of wildlife ponds. Previously they owned and managed Nethergill Farm in the Yorkshire Dales. They built an eco-hill farm business with a sustainable added-value meat activity, an educational and field study facility and eco-tourism holiday lets.

Chris is a partner in Nethergill Associates, a business management consultancy currently assisting with the conjecturing and management of future farming uncertainties in all four countries within the UK. He is co-author of ‘The Less is More’ report commissioned by the RSPB, National Trust and Wildlife Trust. A former farm tenant and farm manager, Chris now has thirty years of business management experience. Nethergill Associates has expertise in financial management, marketing and farm business planning

Nic Renison

Cadeirydd NFFN Lloegr

Nic Renison

Cadeirydd NFFN Lloegr

Nic originates from a dairy farm on the Welsh Borders and spent her first ten years working within family business. The simplicity, integrity and honesty of that cycle and its value to the producer, environment and consumer hasn’t left her conscience. After moving to Cumbria to work with milk recording then animal drugs, she met her husband Paul, latterly moving to Cannerheugh in 2012 with their children. Nature and farming create the heart of their business. After working for AHDB, Nic is now embarking upon developing the farm business full time including the egg mobile, direct sales of meat and starting a glamping enterprise.

Neil Heseltine

England Steering Group Advisor

Neil Heseltine

England Steering Group Advisor

Neil was born and brought up at Hill Top Farm, Malham in North Yorkshire, where he now farms with his partner Leigh. In 2003, as part of a conservation grazing scheme he re-introduced 20 Belted Galloway cattle to join the Swaledale sheep flock. This proved to be a defining time for Neil in terms of ethos and mind-set, as he sought more sustainable and environmentally friendly production methods.

Martin Hole

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Martin Hole

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Martin farms with his family at Montague on the western edge of the Pevensey Levels in East Sussex. Two thirds of the land falls across grazing marshes, managed to restore wetlands for nesting Lapwing and Redshank and a complex of damp and herb-rich organic pasture. He looks after a flock of some 850 Romney ewes and a mixed breed beef herd of Sussex and Angus cattle. 


Patrick Barker

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Patrick Barker

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

Patrick is a farmer and conservationist from Westhorpe in Mid-Suffolk. His 533ha family farm is a LEAF Demonstration Farm, an AHDB Strategic Farm and they are past winners of both the Farmers Weekly Countryside Farmer of the Year and FWAG’s Silver Lapwing award. Conservation is integral to the farm, they have a Countryside Stewardship Higher Tier scheme and Patrick’s ethos is to farm in modern, productive ways while having a farm full of wildlife. Patrick is a BTO licensed bird ringer and an area coordinator for the Suffolk Community Barn Owl Project. 

David Lord

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

David Lord

Grŵp Llywio Lloegr

David manages the farming side of his business on the Northeast Essex coast, farming approx. 750ha of mixed soils but predominantly heavy London Clay. His farming system revolves around soil conservation and regeneration using cover cropping, diverse rotations and direct drilling to reduce inputs and improve biodiversity on the land he farms. His farm is also in HLS, and neighbours SSSI salt marsh owned by Essex Wildlife Trust, so he sees a lot of interesting bird life and a variety of habitat on the farm. David is a strong supporter of independent science and farmer led decision making. He is currently chairman of Colchester branch NFU, and also a steering group member for the AHDBs Eastern strategic farm. 

Maniffesto i Loegr

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Michael Meharg

Cadeirydd GI

Michael Meharg

Cadeirydd GI

Michael Meharg farms a 250ha suckler cow enterprise in county Antrim which includes conservation on a number of protected sites in NI. Passionate about the environment and rare breeds and with a background in ecology, Michael facilitates work with farmers in the Lough Neagh area Environmental Farming Scheme, focusing on delivering for priority habitats and breeding waders. Michael is interested in how the public and the market can better support nature-friendly farming produce across Northern Ireland.


Tim Morrow

Grŵp Llywio GI

Tim Morrow

Grŵp Llywio GI

Tim Morrow farms at Streamvale Farm, a dairy farm situated in the Castlereagh Hills above Dundonald. Tim has worked on the farm since his return from a stint at Newcastle University in 1980.

David Sandford

Grŵp Llywio GI

David Sandford

Grŵp Llywio GI

David is an arable farmer & passionate about the environment. He was the Purdey Gold Award Winner 2016, Northern Ireland Wildlife Farmer of the Year 2015 & RFS Farm & Small Woodland Award joint winner 2021. David is also a committee member of the management body for the Strangford and Lecale AONB and advisory member for the Strangford Lough Marine Protected Area.

Helen Keys

Grŵp Llywio GI

Helen Keys

Grŵp Llywio GI

Helen and husband Charlie farm 50 acres in rural Tyrone with an ever-increasing mixture including flax (for fibre), oats, potatoes, apples and pears. They are the first commercial producers of Irish grown linen in forty years. Helen is a co-founder of Source Grow, an online platform to help farmers decide what to grow to suit their soil and local market demand. It allows restaurants and retailers to place orders with multiple growers for delivery within two days. Helen is also an Entrepreneur in Residence at Queen's University Belfast and an Innovation Broker for the Water Innovation Network, working to create nature-based solutions to improve water quality in the Ballinderry Catchment.

Charlie Cole

Grŵp Llywio GI

Charlie Cole

Grŵp Llywio GI

Charlie Cole a first-generation farmer who manages Broughgammon on the North coast of Antrim. The farm, famous for its award-winning rose veal and goat burgers, has been championing sustainability and the principle of ‘forward-thinking farming’ since 2012. Broughgammon is a mixed system aiming to demonstrate high welfare standards, environmental stewardship resilience and profitability. Charlie is a passionate advocate for locally produced sustainable food, highlighting that nature-friendly farming can play a key role in addressing many of the current problems facing food and farming at present.

David Ford

Grŵp Llywio GI

David Ford

Grŵp Llywio GI

After retiring from a long career in politics, David has more time for farming. His wife, Anne, and he operate a certified organic beef and sheep system on their small farm in County Antrim. They celebrated David’s ‘retirement’ by planting over 400 metres of native hedgerow and are now watching it grow. David believes that nature-friendly farming can play a pivotal role in providing solutions to a number of the environmental challenges we face at present. It is pivotal to halting biodiversity loss as well as helping face the climate challenge.

Tony Johnson

Grŵp Llywio GI

Tony Johnson

Grŵp Llywio GI

Tony Johnston is a Chartered Forester who runs the largest Christmas Tree farm in Northern Ireland. As a forestry agent he manages woodland for over 100 private and corporate landowners. He sits on the DAERA RDP Monitoring Committee, Plant Health Stakeholders Group and is the Confederation of Forestry Industries representative with the Forest Service Grants and Regulations Branch, focusing particularly on grant scheme development. He was a runner-up in the 2019 NI Farmer of the Year award.


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Phil Knott

is-Gadeirydd NFFN yr Alban

Phil Knott

is-Gadeirydd NFFN yr Alban

Phil Knott is a crofter on the Sleat Peninsula on the Isle of Skye. Phil lives with his partner and daughter on a 3ha wooded croft. He has come to crofting from a different angle to most, that of being a wildlife and land management expert but with no direct farming experience. His knowledge in flora, fauna, geology and soil has given him a good grounding and makes him look at the land in different ways to others. Being a wildlife tour leader has taken him all over the world, as well as to every corner of Scotland, especially the Highlands and Islands where he has studied all of the different farming practices.

He moved to Scotland in 2004 and has always wanted to manage his own piece of land, it took over ten years to find the right spot, but it was worth waiting for. Pockets of land are hard to get hold of in the Highlands of Scotland, but crofting does give present an opportunity to get your foot on the ladder.

Denise Walton

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Denise Walton

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Denise Walton and her family took over Peelham Farm in 1993. They farm to encourage birds and pollinating insects to live on the land. They converted to organic following the CAP reform of 2002, which facilitated funding. They restored hedges and fence lines, making sure they connected so birds and wildlife can use them as a food source or for protection from predators. Denise says there needs to be a balance between productivity for livelihood and productivity for wildlife, which is why grant aid is important. 


Patrick Laurie

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Patrick Laurie

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Patrick Laurie farms at Culkeist, near Dalbeattie. A small number of pedigree Riggit Galloway calves were bought in 2015, and this has grown into a suckler herd which grazes at Culkeist and on surrounding moorland in East Galloway. Patrick worked as a project manager at the Heather Trust for eight years, running their communications strategy and delivering advisory support on issues such as peatland restoration, heather beetle, black grouse conservation and marginal grazing for moorland and hill farmers across the UK.

In 2018, he moved to Soil Association Scotland to deliver their Farming with Nature program, funded by KTIF, RSPB and Scottish Water, looking at issues which ranged from grassland improvement to bracken control and the conservation of lapwings. Now working freelance, Patrick retains a range of clients across Scotland, providing support and advice for estates, farms and upland businesses. He is currently engaged in setting up The Galloway Hills Network, a farmer-led group designed to explore innovation and best practice in upland farming.

Becci Barr

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Becci Barr

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Bio coming soon!

Johnnie Balfour

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Johnnie Balfour

Grŵp Llywio yr Alban

Bio coming soon!


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Hilary Kehoe

Cadeirydd NFFN Cymru

Hilary Kehoe

Cadeirydd NFFN Cymru

Hilary and her husband farm at Tyddyn Isaf, which overlooks the Menai Straits near Bethesda. They also have mountain rights on Llanllechid Common for their Welsh Hill flock and graze Highland and Belted Galloway cattle and Manx Loughton sheep on nature reserves from Pwllheli to Bangor, Anglesey and the coast below the farm. In addition to the farm they also run a countryside contracting business with their children which incorporates grazing livestock into management of the nature reserves for the Wildlife Trust, local councils and holiday parks. Grazing animals create conditions for a range of species and habitats such as grassland waxcap fungi, breeding waders, leeches, wildflower meadows, wetlands, sand dunes and heathland. The sheep and cattle are finished slowly and are marketed through local butchers or as premium meat through local sales. Although not registered as organic the farm is run on organic principles with no fertiliser, herbicides or pesticides used.

Sorcha Lewis

Is-Gadeirydd NFFN Cymru

Sorcha Lewis

Is-Gadeirydd NFFN Cymru

Sorcha and Brian farm on a 580ha traditional family hill farm in the Elan Valley Mid Wales, part of the Cambrian Mountains. They farm native hill sheep and Shorthorn/Hereford cattle in a sustainable way which provides a wealth of wildlife that thrives in harmony with this traditional way of life. The area is popular for walkers, cyclists, families, wildlife watchers, star gazers; all which benefit from the way the farmers in the water catchment manage the landscape around the reservoirs providing an array of benefits to people, environment and wildlife as well as raising quality nature friendly food.

The farm is important for many important Welsh wildlife species that are dependent on the special habitats on farm, such as nationally important hay meadows, rhos pasture, wax-cap rich grasslands, Fridd, regenerative woodland and upland peatlands. The open hills are important for rare birds such as the golden plover, dunlin and curlew with areas where you can find large heath butterfly and water vole. The weather and topography mean that you need to farm in a way that works with all the elements; it is nature that shows us the best way to farm in such a remote landscape. Brian and Sorcha passionately believe that embracing wildlife and encouraging wildlife has made their farm more resilient and less reliant on bringing in chemicals, feed and stock.

Sam Kenyon

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Sam Kenyon

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Although from a farming background, Sam didn’t start working in agriculture until her mid-thirties. Now living on the banks of the River Elwy in North Wales, her holding comprises of lowland fertile flood plain and ancient steep woodland. She is passionate about health, welfare and the behaviour of both livestock and wildlife. Sam believes strongly that a biodiverse and regenerative approach to farming and our soils are key to mitigating the effects of the climate crisis. By re-sowing maize fields with species-rich permanent pasture mixes as well as planting hedgerows and trees, Sam is working for soil resilience, reduced erosion, increased carbon sequestration all year round and a complete regenerative system encompassing livestock and nature.

Hywel Morgan

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Hywel Morgan

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Hywel farms at Esgairllaethdy, Myddfai near Llandovery in Carmarthenshire in the western end of the Brecon Beacons National Park. His farm includes a160-acre upland/hill beef, a sheep farm, 20 acres rented land plus 80 acres of conservation grazing and grazing rights on the adjoining common. Hywel has cut out bagged fertiliser completely, reduced bought in concentrates considerably, stopped using chemical sprays, reduced the number of wormers and pour-ons used. He has also reduced the use of plastic and makes more hay. He has created habitat corridors, pond, and manages hedges differently by allowing them to grow taller and wider lightly trimming in a rotation. Some are left to grow which will mean hedge laying or coppicing. Finally, he has established some herbal leys. He believes that working with Nature is key, not against it.

Gerald Miles

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Gerald Miles

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Gerald describes himself as an Organic Farmer and resilient campaigner for Food Sovereignty and feels privileged to be a member of the Land Workers Alliance and NFFN. Gerald farms on the west coast of Pembrokeshire, and is an active campaigner against genetically modified crops and pesticides. In 2003 he drove his tractor all the way from West Wales to Downing Street to protest about GM crops and to raise support from fellow farmers.

In 2010, Gerald launched Wales’ first community supported agriculture (CSA) scheme. He believes the CSA model allows a mutually beneficial relationship between farmers and the community. The people who joined his CSA came to the farm regularly and began to refer to it as ‘our farm’. He also works to run the Llafur Ni (Our Cereals) network - a group which works together to revive rare Welsh landrace oats and share diverse grains. They also have a focus on knowledge sharing, with older farmers accompanying new entrants to Welsh cereal farming, sharing their knowledge of traditional ecological growing practices.

Matt Swarbrick

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Matt Swarbrick

Grŵp Llywio Cymru

Matt farms using permaculture, agroecology and holistic management which results in a very multi-layered, mixed approach to running the family's 80-acre farm, Henbant, in North West Wales. He believes that farming with nature can result in farms which produce real food and financial profit whilst also building biodiversity, soil and social capital.  He thinks it is essential that eating is not seen as a necessarily ecologically negative act and that humans value their role in positively designed, regenerative ecosystems that enhance our world for both humans and nature. 

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Cwestiynau Cyffredin

Partneriaid a Chefnogwyr

Cefnogwch y Rhwydwaith Ffermio sy’n Gyfeillgar i Natur a gwnewch wahaniaeth cadarnhaol heddiw Os ydych chi’n sefydliad sydd â diddordeb mewn cefnogi’r Rhwydwaith Ffermio sy’n Gyfeillgar i Natur gallwch gofrestru ar-lein